Friday, August 9, 2019

Matter over Mind




Matter over Mind

Fran Cook, Publishing Assistant





Even if nothing comes from something, be proud that it’s your original 100% something. Mark Twain declared, “The secret of getting ahead is getting started.” In order to win the lottery, your chances increase tremendously if you buy a ticket.
The only instrument that is keeping you from your next piece of greatness is your mind—fear of what they’ll think; fear of mistakes. Fear is the author’s “F” word.
Dump the fear, close your eyes and start typing what flows through your fingertips. Type your thoughts and don’t worry about the order or sequence in the beginning. Set a goal to write one chapter or 5 pages without touching the backspace key. Then celebrate when you gaze at all that beautiful—and maybe scrambled for now— ink on pages that you just created. Take a 10-minute break, roar out a high school cheer, pat yourself on the back, do some stretches and get back to it! One small celebration leads to the next and before you know it, you are writing the conclusion!
When your mind sees progress, excitement levels increase, adrenaline starts to flow and then comes a burst of creative innovation. Adrenaline pumps through your body, “sharpening mental focus,” which will get those fingers dancing like never before. Write in that moment like never before and don’t look back.

Matter over mind is when your pen controls the story, not the spinning thoughts of doubt, fear or brain freeze. Matter over mind is showing that output is more important than thought put, for the time being. Matter over mind is when the physical keystroke pushes beyond the supersonic thoughts racing for 1st place.
Matter over mind is when, all that matters, is action, forward momentum and progress. The details will come to you in time, once you’ve laid the genuine foundation or framework of your message, which spews from our soul.

The Proverbial Verb



The Proverbial Verb

Fran Cook, Publishing Assistant




“When in doubt, strike it out,” Mark Twain so wisely stated. This famous quote, once mastered, can turn your writing upside down—as Diana Ross declared—and all around. Jerry Jenkin’s incredible verb list can boost your manuscript fervor from good to stellar, from palatable to delicious, ensuing your readers to crave more.
Replace those “ing” words like “is going” and “am wanting” to “leaving” and “desire.” A simple replacement, with a verb that has its own muscle speaks to the reader’s eyes and ears. Yes, readers use three senses actually, when they read: hearing, seeing and feeling. They eye sees the text, converts it to meaning and creates a voice that speaks to the reader. That voice, whether shocked, petrified, supercharged or revitalized creates the emotion, sometimes adrenaline that captivates and ushers in the reader until their spouse demands they put your book down; after all the family needs to eat you know.
When do you strike out the one or two plain verbs for the dynamic action verbs? When reading your own thriller manuscript replaces your valium prescription within 3 minutes of consumption, Houston, we have a problem. It’s time to revert to the proverbial verb list—okay, did I mention to avoid redundancy? If authors add adverbs to take up space and describe verbs that don’t need describing, then either redundancy, confusion or boredom may occur.
If a verb can’t stand alone or shouldn’t stand alone because the mental picture could go either way, then expound with an adverb. Forgive me for this very ridiculously obvious example, “The car hurriedly raced down the freeway.” I don’t know of any other way to race down the highway, except in high gear, in a hurry. Strikeout “hurriedly” in a hurry; please!
When in doubt, strike it out and dig deep for those meaningful verbs with a punch!

Matter over Mind

Matter over Mind Fran Cook, Publishing Assistant Even if nothing comes from something, be pr...